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Waweplant Tordenskiold is back in the North Sea

The wave plant prototype Tordenskiold is back in the North Sea. For the second time Crestwing, the company behind the wave plant, is testing how much energy the plant can produce. Crestwing plans to build a larger prototype later this year and if everything goes as planned the plant will be joined by two others. The models will measure 70 by 18 meters and are thus more than twice the size of the Tordenskiolds plant. One of the major challenges of wave energy is to build facilities that can withstand the violent forces of the sea. To avoid shipwreck, Crestwing uses a three-point anchorage system with flexible lines. The anchor tower enables the system to rotate 360 ​​degrees, and that enables the plant to minimize the impact of the waves.

Behind the yellow steel facades of Tordenskiold is a PTO system. The wave force moves a push rod, which sets a rack and a cog in motion, and that drives a generator. The rotation increases through a Speed ​​Up gear, where a flywheel stabilizes the rotation and smooths the electricity production. According to Crestwing the system can convert almost 90 precent of the absorbed energy into electricity.